Advice & Consent 29: A Hearing Wrap-up & a Political Assessment

The Senate Judiciary Committee hearings have concluded, and we’re now counting votes. What’s the ragtag gang of the usual suspects (ha, that’s “RGOTUS”) political assessment? We’re less than a week away from the committee vote and less than two from the promised floor vote.

Advice & Consent 29: A Hearing Wrap-up + a Political Assessment

Direct download: Advice & Consent 29: A Hearing Wrap-up + a Political Assessment (mp3)

The RGOTUS this week

Tim bumps into Sen. Wyden at the airport and chats about SCOTUS at the departures  level at PDX (pro-tip: that’s the spot to get picked up when in the Land of Sunshine and BunniesTM). Spoiler alert: he’s opposing Gorsuch.

Lena goes on another law-talky podcast.

Adam pillories one of the worst op-eds in NYT history.

Hearing wrapup

A few minutes of a Lena solo (eat your heart out Neil Peart!)

Political Assessment

 

  • Republicans need to decide if they’re willing to go nuclear to put Neil Gorsuch on the Court.
    • Are any Rs not up for this fight, but also willing to publicly side with Ds and against the vast majority of the R electorate?
    • Do any of their names rhyme with Skritch Buconnell?
  • Democrats need to decide if opposition is “worth it” enough to burn the filibuster now, even if it is easily circumvented by the nuclear option.
    • Do red state Ds up for reelection perceive a threat to their chances if they oppose?
    • Do D’s generally feel pressure to oppose from the increasingly active base?

Adam

Given that one of the main ways that this seemingly foregone conclusion of cloture vote fails, nuclear option invoked, Gorsuch confirmed by majority vote will be derailed is by a last-minute deal between Dems and Rs to preserve the filibuster for a future nominee but not use it on Gorsuch, I want to talk about the last time such a deal happened.

In 2001-02, Democrats had control of the Senate and dealt with a slew of some of the most out-of-the-mainstream circuit court nominees, allowing several through but blocking 2 in the Judiciary Committee. Dems lost their majority in the ‘02 election, and decided to filibuster the nominees they had blocked as well as several other nominees. Fortuitously, at the same time, Robert Caro published Master of the Senate, third of the fourth in his Years of Lyndon Johnson series, which detailed the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1957 with LBJ as Senate Majority Leader. No civil rights bill had been passed since 1875 and the Eisenhower administration was trying to woo African Americans back to their traditional home in the Republican Party, which they had been leaving as they moved north and after Truman integrated the army and Ds put a civil rights plank in their platform in ‘48 and the administration set its sights on passing a civil rights bill. Caro described a trick to get around the filibuster by having the VP, the president of the Senate, Nixon at the time, declare that the filibuster was unconstitutional and then have a majority of the Senate agree with that ruling. LBJ eventually defused this action and passed the bill with a large majority of both Ds voting for it, but Trent Lott, who was almost the majority leader in 2003, but had to step aside after praising Strom Thurmond’s 1948 segregationist run for the president, said that using this method to get around the filibuster would work, but it would be the “nuclear option” because it would blow up the Senate. Dems did not heed Lott, and filibustered more than 10 nominees.

In the 2004, Rs expanded their majority from 51 to 55 and immediately suggested that they would go nuclear if Democrats filibustered again. This was particularly important because Rehnquist had been diagnosed with cancer and a SCOTUS vacancy was likely. The Senate spent the first few months confirming less controversial nominees but ran out of nominees to confirm by May at which point then-Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist scheduled a confirmation vote on one of the previously filibustered nominees. Both sides were lobbying very hard, and it became clear that there were 49 Republican senators in favor of the nuclear option, and Arlen Specter (a Republican at them time) was the only one undeclared. Democrats were pretty sure that Specter–who was Judiciary Committee chairman at the time and would lose the seat if he went against the rest of his caucus–would vote for the nuclear option if the vote were called. So 14 senators, 7 Rs and 7 Ds came together to say that they would not vote for the nuclear option (meaning there were less than 50 votes for the nuclear option) and would not vote to filibuster a nominee (meaning any filibuster vote would fail) unless the group (which dubbed itself the Gang of 14) came to an agreement that there were extraordinary circumstances meriting a filibuster.

A few of Bush’s nominees did fall by the wayside, although some were definitely not due to the deal and some were only questionably due to the deal. The ones that failed were Miguel Estrada for the D.C. Circuit, Terry Boyle for the 4th Circuit, Charles Pickering for the 5th Circuit, Henry Saad for the 6th Circuit and William Myers and Carolyn Kuhl for the Ninth Circuit. The ones that went through directly due to the deal were William Pryor for the 11th Circuit, Janice Rogers Brown for the DC Circuit, and Priscilla Owen for the 5th Circuit.

Now, everyone knew that the Rs on the Gang of 14 would never agree that there were extraordinary circumstances, so that the filibuster was gone. But the thought was that Ds had no leverage, and the best they could do was keep the filibuster alive (although on life support) for another day. Now that this other day has come, with Republicans stealing a Supreme Court seat, I don’t see Democrats thinking that if they give up on the filibuster here, they will ever be able to use the filibuster at a future time when there are extreme circumstances.

Lena

Rs inclined to oppose (e.g. Flake, Murkowski, Collins, Graham, Heller) but I think McConnell will decide and everyone will fall in line. But they’ll be blaming the Democrats for causing this. The other option, however, is that they reject the nomination and come back with someone who is more moderate.

Some Ds are worried but have a few factors: 1) inevitability, 2) energizing the base. Some Ds think Trump will only nominate someone worse during the next vacancy. And there’s fear there could be 2 or so more vacancies. So I think they’re doing some calculus, which is something that’s been top of mind for folks since: 1) Gorsuch was nominated and not Pryor, 2) they are gambling with what might happen in the future and the positioning of the President, Senate, etc.

Moderate Ds who’ve already come out opposed – and are really upset with Gorsuch’s record: Senators Casey, Carper, Nelson. I think there is some momentum that’ll build as this continues. The base is upset, and while I’m not sure the # of calls rival, say DeVos’ opposition, it seems like if they don’t fight they’ll see this as a big victory – and a lifetime appointment – for Trump.

Tim

Agree with Lena… Nobody will change their vote, much less will elections swing, in 2018 over “losing” the filibuster. No. One.

A deal is being bandied about as a non-nuclear end game scenario and that’s just fantasy, unless Ds are gullible enough to believe that Rs would stand by it. The only possible one would be to have a withdrawal and a nomination and approval of Merrick Garland and a promise by Ds to stand aside for Gorsuch should another opening present itself. It sounds like a good deal, but it’s a bad one for both sides. AND LOOKS TOO MUCH LIKE A WEST WING PLOT LINE PEOPLE!

It’s hard to see this ending in any scenario other than filibuster, failure to achieve cloture, and then the nuclear option. The consequences of that… are probably for another show.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *