Advice & Consent 31: Justice Gorsuch*

Yadda yadda yadda, he got confirmed. And the seat is stolen. And he always should be referred to as Justice Gorsuch*

Justice Gorsuch*

 

Direct download:  Advice & Consent 31: Justice Gorsuch* (mp3)

The Senate votes, Justice Gorsuch* confirmed

*Seat stolen by GOP, 2016-2017.

Before reactions… a toast to Sen. Merkley for his voice filibuster this week. All night long, y’all.

Reaction to the filibuster, the nuclear explosion and Justice Asterisk?

Adam: I think filibusters are dumb. The Senate’s filibuster history is a total accident. The VP one day just up and ruled the previous question motion out of order because there was no reason to have a rule cutting off debate when there was such a tiny body. Then at some point, when the Senate got larger, people realized that unlimited debate could stop action on things they didn’t like. At one point, we did have people like Daniel Webster and Henry Clay in the Senate, but that isn’t the way it’s been for most of our history. It’s been more like people like Mitch McConnell and Ted Cruz, orators so grating, you have turn them off.

That said, what’s worse is changing norms and rules right and left to steal a seat and then fill that seat.

And what’s even worse is people who don’t understand the rules. Hey, Senate Dems, an appeal of the ruling of the chair is debatable and therefore filibusterable.

[Tim: Jon Lovett’s 7-point timeline of how we got here.]

Lena: I love deliberative representative democracy. Legislation should take time because it should be done well. Nominations should be thoughtful, and that whole Article II Section 2 Advice and Consent piece seems to indicate is important.

I appreciate that this is all politics and results of elections. And I don’t think elections should be viewed as a winner takes all. I’m weary of the tyranny of the majority. And so, I appreciate tools available to the minority party so that they, too, can have a voice. What I feel about the filibuster is probably some idealized version that politicians would take to the floor and espouse their views. They could signal issues with a debate, and people, particularly other politicians would listen. The filibuster is therefore one of the tools I thought was important. However, the way that it has been used is not what what I believe it was intended to do. It’s become ineffective.

For what happened, I felt that this change shouldn’t be called nuclear because let’s not desensitize ourselves. It’s a change in rules. But I do think this move is horrible. This is what happened b/c this White House and Senate majority are in the winner-takes-all mode.

To get to this point, it’s been political and everyone is blaming the other party. And all under false equivalencies (as we’ve discussed previously) and a sense of inevitability (McConnell made this clear long ago).

In the Executive Business meeting on Monday and in most press statement, Rs have been lamenting “having to make this change” it didn’t seem like anyone could persuade McConnell. And maybe they didn’t want to. McConnell high 5ed Cornyn after the change and then McConnell all thumbs up.

Disappointed: Schumer et al should have used the 30 hours post cloture to debate this nomination. At a minimum, make speeches and use the tools and time.

Justice Asterisk? He’ll be forever known as the litmus tested justice. I hope that instills in him an even further appreciation for the need to be independent. To check himself as he hears cases and writes opinions. But I’m not hopeful based on his record. Sure, there will be times people will tell me “see, not so bad.” But I’m starting to believe Trump and people’s past record that got them to the point where folks say “you need this guy b/c he’ll overturn Roe and the NRA’s version of the Second Amendment”

[Tim: Rick Hasen Q to his Twitter followers: When will Justice Gorsuch* first rule in a way contrary to conservatives? My answer: Never.]

Tim: I’ve always felt ambivalent about the filibuster. I mentioned it on episode 018, aka the “let’s talk everyone off the ledge” episode of the pod. Also known as “Tim slaps an explicit tag on the pod.”  

I understand why the Dems filibustered and I understand why the GOP went nuclear, even if I still bristle mightily at the larceny of the seat.

Other non-SCOTUS-focused media seemed surprised there was so little energy behind the two sides, even if there was high antipathy. I think the reason was very clear… by about 10pm ET on November 8th… before the final votes were cast, but right about when it was clear Trump was going to win… today’s outcome was preordained. The identity of Justice Asterisk was unknown, but the dance card was set. Perhaps that’s the saddest part of all of this… the Court may one day revert to being above politics, but I can’t forsee a day in my lifetime when it won’t be. Too many burned bridges.

I question what the new paradigm is… It may be seats on the Court are only filled when the same party holds the Senate and the White House. That means long-term vacancies during divided government. It means POTUS and Senate campaigns with SCOTUS shortlists. It seems to be the inevitable outcome here, but I hope I’m wrong.

Cases coming before SCOTUS – WaPo

Voting restrictions in NC

Whether a bakery can refuse a cake to a gay couple

Whether self-protection outside the home means 2nd Amendment scrutiny covers some carry laws

etc.

More norm breaking – rumors of dropping blue slips for lower court judges

Reaction?

Lena:

  • Lower courts: over 130 lower court vacancies already # of judgeships likely to increase
  • Blue slips: selection vs. confirmation
  • Changing blue slip rules could be pretty bad for a number of reasons:
    • Who carries the water?
    • Who will further be annoyed?
    • Advice and consent changed even more

 

Adam: Before I started working on judicial nominees, I had no idea the extent to which home-state senators were involved in judge-picking. When the president and both home-state senators are from the same party, the senators basically pick the trial court judges and sometimes the court of appeals judges. When at least one senator is from a different party, they basically have a veto on the court picks as long as either their party controls the Senate or they don’t abuse it.

There are not a large number of examples of Judiciary Committee chairmen holding hearings and votes without receiving blue slips from both Senate even though they have officially left themselves room to ignore the blue slips. Orrin Hatch did it for 4 nominees in 2004 under heavy pressure from the rest of his caucus, but he wasn’t happy about it. I get the sense that Grassley really doesn’t give a darn about the norms of the Senate (hi, ex-Sen. Norm Coleman) and McConnell certainly doesn’t. And Trump assuredly doesn’t. I think it’s over.

Tim: Bottom line: this is court packing, pure and simple. And court packing by eliminating a norm that assured moderation in states with split party representation. Norms aren’t laws and the GOP knows it can change these norms without getting nailed on it. They did it for Garland, and they’re doing it for lower court judges should this blue slip rumor be true.

The modern nomination process has produced a judiciary as political as the other branches

Agree or disagree?

Tim: The Court has been ideologically divided along different lines for a long time… back to Marbury days. But since the Bork nomination, the politics of nominations has politicized the judiciary in a discomfiting way. The only ameliorating thing is the lifetime tenure and that may matter less over time. It’s time we acknowledged this in the nomination process and end the nomination “rules” fictions so we can properly assess these nominees through the very real ideological/political lens rather than pretend otherwise.

Adam: I think it’s an inevitable result of the parties evolving from ideologically heterogeneous to ideologically homogeneous. The reason why there were so many “mistakes” liberal justices appointed by Republicans and one conservative appointed by a Democrat, Byron White, was at least in part because presidents had to appease different ideological wings of their own party. (It might even explain Souter since George H.W. Bush, his chief of staff who pushed for Souter, John Sununu, and Souter himself came from the moderate New England wing of the GOP, of which Susan Collins is the hardy surviving member.) Now that the most liberal Republican in each house of Congress is more conservative than the most conservative Democratic member, there is a huge downside and no upside to a Republican choosing an ideological liberal or a Democrat choosing an ideological conservative.

So we therefore have a Supreme Court where, like Congress, the most liberal Republican appointee, Kennedy, is more conservative than the most conservative Democratic appointee (either Breyer or Kagan, depending on your perspective). I do think that life tenure, the robes, and the common law needs to base judicial decisions in reason and precedent does still remove the judiciary from politics in a way that Congress is never removed. Example: conservative Kentucky senator (and awesome pitcher) Jim Bunning installed his own son, David Bunning, as a district court judge. Seems like he would just be a politician in judicial robes Yet Bunning was the one to enforce the Obergefell decision and hold Kentucky Rowan County official Kim Davis in contempt.

Lena: Almost: In our lifetime, we haven’t had a majority of Supreme Court justices who probably are in line with where we tend to be. But the perception hasn’t been there and that’s pretty deliberate. There’s been a movement afoot for decades to try to make sure there would be more reliable justices who aren’t disappointments (Chief Justice Roberts is still invoked in angry rants by Rs). This seems to be the trend.

Perception is perhaps even more important. The process for how judges get to the bench = political. But our system of government and legitimizing our justice system depends on people believing the system is independent and fair. The courthouse doors have to be open to everyone. These confirmation processes can be helpful in terms of raising awareness and educating people about the courts. But the R said/did vs D said/did doesn’t help.

Litmus tests and campaigning with a list of potential nominees also serves only to politicize this process.

Some ways to depoliticize: timelines, terms

Programming note: Season finale in a few weeks

We have surprises and special guests. No peeking.

 

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